arrow-down arrow-left arrow-open-down arrow-open-up arrow-right arrow-up close documents dot-arrow-down dot-arrow-right facebook fb-square google linkedin menu search twitter whatsapp

MSF is an international, independent, private and non-profit organisation. It comprises 21 main national offices and 10 specialised organisations, which take charge of specific activities such as humanitarian relief supplies. As these organisations are controlled by MSF, they are included in the scope of the MSF Financial report and the figures presented here. These figures describe MSF’s finances on a combined international level. They are for the 2014 calendar year. All amounts are presented in millions of euros.

2014 ACTIVITY HIGHLIGHTS

8,250,700
outpatient consultations

194,400
women delivered babies, including caesarean sections

32,700
group counselling or mental health sessions

511,800
patients admitted

81,700
major surgical interventions, including obstetric surgery, under general or spinal anaesthesia

46,900
people treated for cholera
Cholera ›

2,114,900
cases of malaria treated
Malaria ›

11,200
patients medically treated for sexual violence

1,513,700
people vaccinated against measles in response to an outbreak

217,900
severely malnourished children admitted to inpatient or outpatient feeding programmes

21,500
patients on tuberculosis first-line treatment
Tuberculosis ›

33,700
people treated for measles
Measles ›

229,900
HIV patients registered under care at the end of 2014
HIV ›

1,800
patients on MDR tuberculosis treatment, second-line drugs
Tuberculosis ›

75,100
vaccinated against meningitis in response to an outbreak
Meningitis ›

218,400
patients on first-line antiretroviral treatment at the end of 2014

185,700
individual mental health consultations

7,400
people admitted to Ebola management centres in the three main west African countries, of which 4,700 were confirmed as having Ebola
Ebola ›

8,100
patients on second-line antiretroviral treatment at the end of 2014 (first-line treatment failure)

2,200
people recovered from Ebola and discharged from management centres in the three main west African countries
Ebola ›

MSF PROGRAMMES AROUND THE WORLD


MSF has 384 projects in 63 countries. Click on the map to find out more.

The place names and boundaries used in this report do not reflect any position by MSF on their legal status.

LARGEST COUNTRY PROGRAMMES BASED ON EXPENDITURE

  1. South Sudan
  2. Democratic Republic of Congo
  3. Central African Republic
  4. Haiti
  5. Sierra Leone
  6. Afghanistan
  7. Niger
  8. Liberia
  9. Ethiopia
  10. Iraq

The total expenditure for our programmes in these 10 countries is 380.5 million euros, 54 per cent of MSF´s operational expenses.

 

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MSF FINANCIAL REPORT HERE


CONTEXT OF INTERVENTIONS

Number of projects

WHERE DID THE MONEY GO?

WHERE DID THE MONEY COME FROM?

YEAR-END FINANCIAL POSITION

In millions of euros

The 2014 combined international figures have been prepared in accordance with MSF international accounting standards, which comply with most of the requirements of the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The figures have been jointly audited by the accounting firms of KPMG and Ernst & Young, in accordance with International Auditing Standards. A copy of the full 2014 Financial Report may be obtained at www.msf.org. In addition, each national office of MSF publishes annual, audited Financial Statements according to its national accounting policies, legislation and auditing rules. Copies of these reports may be requested from the national offices.Programme expenses represent expenses incurred in the field or by headquarters on behalf of the field.Social mission includes all costs related to operations in the field as well as all the medical and operational support from the headquarters directly allocated to the field and “témoignage/awareness-raising” activities.

Other expenses comprises costs associated with raising funds from all possible sources, the expenditures incurred in the management and administration of the organisation, as well as income tax paid on commercial activities.

Permanently restricted funds may be capital funds, where donors require the assets to be invested or retained for long-term use rather than expended; or the minimum compulsory level of retained earnings to be maintained in some countries.

Unrestricted funds are unspent, non-designated donor funds expendable at the discretion of MSF’s trustees in furtherance of our social mission.
Other retained earnings are foundations’ capital and translation adjustments arising from the translation of entities’ financial statements into euros. Unspent donor-designated/restricted funds are not included as retained earnings, but are treated as deferred income.

Restricted funds may be capital funds, where the assets are required by the donors to be invested or retained for long term use, rather than expended short term, or which may be the minimum compulsory level of retained earnings to be maintained in some countries. Unspent donor-designated/restricted funds are not included as retained earnings, but are treated as deferred income.

MSF’s restricted and unrestricted funds have been built up over the years by surpluses of income over expenses. At the end of 2014, the available portion (excluding permanently restricted funds and capital for foundations) represented 9.8 months of the preceding year’s activity. The purpose of maintaining these retained earnings is to meet the following needs: working capital needs over the course of the year, as fundraising traditionally has seasonal peaks while expenditure is relatively constant; swift operational response to humanitarian needs that will be funded by forthcoming public fundraising campaigns and/or by public institutional funding; future major humanitarian emergencies for which sufficient funding cannot be obtained; the sustainability of long-term programmes (e.g. antiretroviral treatment programmes); and a sudden drop in private and/or public institutional funding that cannot be matched in the short term by a reduction in expenditure.